Why You Should Consider a Nursing Career at ECH

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Why You Should Consider a Nursing Career at ECH

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Why You Should Consider a Nursing Career at ECH

If you work as a nurse, you’re probably already aware of the demand for qualified nursing professionals. As such, you may have your pick of jobs from which to choose. If you haven’t yet considered working in senior care at the Episcopal Church Home, here’s a closer look at five reasons why an amazing nursing career is waiting for you at this premier Louisville area continuing care retirement community.

1. You’ll have the chance to make a real difference.

While working in the field of healthcare is always accompanied by the chance to make an impact, nurses who specialize in senior health are uniquely positioned to improve not only the health of the patients for whom they care but also their quality of life. Many older people are lonely, in pain and afraid of losing their independence. Compassionate and empathetic nurses not only provide a vital service in providing essential medical care and services to seniors; they also help them maintain their independence and sense of self.

Nurses can also be critical advocates for older adults, helping to ensure that their physical, social and emotional needs are adequately understood and met. Not all senior living environments are as amenable to facilitating these key relationships as others, however. ECH’s person-centered approach to care keeps the resident as the focus thereby enhancing the potential impact of the healthcare workers who care for them.

2. You’ll enjoy high levels of career satisfaction.

People who work with seniors are among the most satisfied healthcare professionals. Explains the American Geriatrics Society (AGS), “Geriatrics healthcare professionals cite their encounters with inspirational older adults, the deep and meaningful relationships they develop, and the typically steady work hours as significant factors adding to their job satisfaction.”

3. Your experience and skills will be held in increasingly high regard.

While the entire field of nursing is set for tremendous growth, the aging population, longer life spans, and a preponderance of long-term care facilities mean that nurses with expertise in caring for seniors will be especially in demand. In addition to promising job security and stability, this trend also brings ample potential for advancement and growth within the field, as well as desirable compensation. In fact, Nurse.org recently included gerontological nurse practitioners in its roundup of the highest-paying nursing jobs.

4. You’ll gain new perspectives—and become a better nurse in the process.

“I get to time travel to different eras and cultures because older people are so willing to share their life story,” one geriatric nurse told AGS. This is just one of the many ways caring for seniors can support the development of new perspectives which can help healthcare professionals perform their jobs better. Elders have so much knowledge to share, and the nurses who care for them stand to benefit from this wisdom.

Furthermore, aging is part of the cycle of life and affects us all. Unfortunately, many people don’t give much thought to what’s ahead for themselves and their loved ones until it’s too late to do anything about it. Witnessing the struggles associated with aging can help you evaluate your life and set priorities, such as spending more time with the people you love.

Despite the challenges they face, older people are also more likely to show positive emotions while regulating their negative emotional states than younger adults, according to research published in Current Directions of Psychological Science. This can make for a more pleasant work environment.

5. You’ll be part of an amazing and supportive community.

Speaking of pleasant work environments, all healthcare settings aren’t created equal. Nor are all senior living communities. ECH is part of Episcopal Retirement Services, which boasts exceptionally high career longevity among its staff. According to Judi Dean, who has been Director of Nursing at an ERS senior living community for more than 30 years, the organization’s commitment to all of its community members, including staff, is exemplary. “ERS believes in taking care of their employees so they, in turn, can take care of the ERS family. You have to have leadership that believes and understands that not only are we a family, but we also have our own families that need us.”

Dean is far from alone. In fact, by the end of 2019, 29 ERS staff members will have been with the company for more than 25 years. This is especially remarkable in an industry known for burnout and high turnover rates.

Dean also cites ERS’s top-down support and patient-centered ethos as further selling points. “You are here to serve these amazing residents who have been a part of our history. When you all have the same goal, it’s easy.”

If the idea of applying your passion for nursing in a person-centered, affluent care setting appeals to you, we hope you’ll consider joining our team. Learn more about working at ECH here.

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Kristin Davenport
By
December 18, 2019
Kristin Davenport is the Director of Communications for Episcopal Retirement Services (ERS). Kristin leads ERS’s efforts to share stories that delight and inspire through social media, online content, annual reports, magazines, newsletters, public relations, and events. Kristin earned her BFA in graphic design from Wittenberg University. She joined ERS after a 25-year career as a visual journalist and creative director in Cincinnati. Kristin is passionate about making Cincinnati a dementia-inclusive city. She is a Lead SAIDO Learning Supporter and a member of the ‘Refresh Your Soul’ conference planning team at ERS. Kristin and her husband Alex, live in Lebanon, Ohio with their 2 daughters. She also serves as a Trustee and the President of the Lebanon Food Pantry and is a board member for ArtScape Lebanon.

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