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Planning Ahead: Care Available in Your Senior Living

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Future Care resized 600As we grow older and consider our options for care in our golden years, we must decide what our long-term care needs may be at any point.  You may have different needs at 55 or 65 than you will at 85 or 95 years old.  Changing needs are something that must be considered in your senior living plans.

At Episcopal Retirement Homes, our planners tend to outline 4 considerations that must be taken into account in the planning process.

What settings and programs are available and what the nature of that care would be
Key to your success in preparing for future care is taking time to learn all you can about the many programs and services available and the settings in which that care may be provided.  This may include one of many senior living communities, receiving care through a government program or from family members, community services, charities, church groups or other volunteer services.

How you will fund long-term care costs. 
Long-term care can be expensive.  In a previous blog entry, we talked about a few of the most common methods that are used to pay for senior living care and services, but we didn’t provide an exhaustive list.  Talk to a financial advisor about all the options that are available to you in your specific situation.

Seek professional planning assistance. 
Choosing the right type of care can be a confusing and frustrating process, largely because most people tend to take a do-it-all-yourself approach.  You don’t have to put yourself through the stress.  There are senior living management professionals who would like nothing more than to help you plan your long-term care needs.

Creating a care plan. 
Once you have gathered all the knowledge you can, it may help to work with someone to determine your current and possible future needs.  At Episcopal Retirement Homes, we offer a geriatric care management services that can help answer your questions about elder care.  Visit our Living Well Senior Solutions website for more information.

If you decide that moving into a senior living community is the best option for your future, there are a few things you should know about the different lifestyles and services available in your senior housing choice.

Independent Living
Older adults who choose independent living communities are able to continue living just as autonomously as they had before their move.  As a member of an independent living community, your new home will have all of the amenities you’re used to—a fully-equipped kitchen, laundry facilities, parking.  The option of bringing in outside help to assist in certain tasks is available, but not mandatory.
Independent living includes a range of housing options—from apartments to free-standing homes—which may be open to any adult, but where typical residents are over the age of 55.

Assisted Living
Seniors who may need extra help to complete daily tasks may choose housing that provides assisted living.  Communities with assisted living still provide independence but with the option of regular assistance in tasks that range from taking medications on schedule to getting ready in the morning.  There may be some higher costs in these communities in order to cover the expenses of bringing in a caregiver.

Skilled Care Facility
Skilled care or rehabilitation facilities provide full time care on par with that received in a hospital.  Daily care and therapy services are provided under the oversight of a licensed physician, and stays can be indefinite or as short as 20 days.

Continuing Care Retirement Community
When a senior living community provides all levels of care, it is considered a continuing care retirement community (CCRC).  This type of community offers all levels of care on a single campus so that residents may age in place, moving through a continuum of care as their needs change.

By
March 29, 2013

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