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Marjorie P. Lee Senior Living Blog

Four Developments Shaping the Future of Memory Care

Dementia care and memory support have historically been difficult to provide. Alzheimer’s and other cognitive disorders have not been well understood, so effective treatments were slow to develop.

But memory care is changing. Now that doctors and medical researchers are beginning to gain a better understanding of dementia’s causes and symptoms, memory support care centers are being designed with patients’ needs and tendencies top of mind.

Here’s how people living with dementia and Alzheimer’s will be cared for in the future.

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How to Tell the Difference Between Dementia and "Normal" Aging

Forgetfulness is common among elderly people. But how can you tell the difference between your older parent or grandparent’s temporary, age-related forgetfulness, and new-onset cognitive disorders like dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, which might require support services or moving to a residential memory care to safely manage?

It can be a bit tricky. But there are methods of distinguishing between memory lapse and memory loss. Today, let’s discuss the signs and signals you can look for when your older loved one is exhibiting possible symptoms of dementia.

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Your First 4 Steps After Mom or Dad is Diagnosed with Dementia

An estimated one in three American seniors are diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease at some point in their lives. That translates to millions of Americans living with a dementia diagnosis, and many more millions of family caregivers providing support to them.

When your parent  is diagnosed with dementia, it can be equally devastating for them and for you. What should you do? What steps should you take to make sure that your parent has the care and support he or she needs?

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The Threat of Alzheimer's Disease Complicates Future Care Decisions

Waiting to learn whether you or a loved one has Alzheimer’s disease is an uneasy time, one usually filled with turmoil and uncertainty. But you may be able to find comfort in facing the disease head on and establishing a plan for your future with Alzheimer's.

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New Study Shows Women Suffer Disproportionately from Alzheimer’s

A 2014 poll conducted by the Alzheimer’s Association (following up on a 2010 poll it performed in association with The Shriver Report) found that women are more likely to feel the effects of Alzheimer's disease than men.

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Can New Medical Tests Improve Senior Life?

The Alzheimer’s Association estimates that there are currently 5.2 million people in the United States living with Alzheimer’s disease. And nearly all experts agree that number will skyrocket to as many as 16 million by the year 2050, barring any new developments in diagnosing and treating this disease.

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Is the Call for Dementia Research in Senior Healthcare Being Heard?

With over 5 million Americans facing Alzheimer’s disease, it is no wonder that it is a disease that has been put in the senior healthcare spotlight as more and more prominent men and women in our country step up as advocates.

In February of 2014, comedian Seth Rogen sat before a U.S. Senate subcommittee to tell the story of how early onset dementia is affecting his family. With this address, Rogen joined a long list of famous names such as Penny Marshall, Maria Shriver and Bryant Gumbel in calling for more funds to go into research aimed at fighting the sixth leading cause of death in the United States.

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Town Shows How Senior Healthcare Can Revolutionize America

Across the country, more than 5 million men and women suffer from dementia, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. As the population ages, the agency predicts more than 7 million people will have the disease by 2025, representing a 40 percent increase. By 2050, the Alzheimer’s Association says that number could top 13.8 million, assuming no treatment has been found to prevent the disease or slow its progression.

National movements to make communities dementia-friendly is a concept that has taken hold in Europe, but has been slower to take root in the U.S. But some states, and individual communities, have begun to take matters into their own hands, creating their own programs and holding collaborative summits to share knowledge and gain a better understanding of the needs of people with dementia.

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Can an At-Home Test Detect Risk Factors for Senior Brain Fitness?

There’s a moment of stunned disbelief when a parent or spouse or other loved one is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. Though you struggle with the diagnosis, you you’ve already noticed a few red flags— obvious memory loss or other indicators of cognitive decline.

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Offer the Right Senior Care for Loved Ones with Dementia

Your whole world shifts when someone you love is diagnosed with dementia.

As there is no known cure for Alzheimer's, many families wonder what they are going to do, how they are they going to provide care for a loved one who is slowly losing the memories and personality that make them the person they have always known.

There are plenty of resources available for families who have made the decision to provide in home care, but many first-time caregivers fail to understand just what that commitment entails.

Providing memory support and daily care to an adult with Alzheimer's or another dementia-type condition is going to be a major commitment, and as memory loss progresses, your parents or spouse will rely more and more on you and other family members for help getting through each day.

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